Bible Commentary: 2 Chronicles 15

By the end of 1st Chronicles, David and his line has been firmly established as the focus of future hope for Israel, and the temple has been identified with David’s line and as a place to seek forgiveness and renewal. There has been exhortation through David and Solomon to seek God and not forsake him (1 Chron 28:8,9; 2 Chron 7:17-22).

From 2nd Chronicles 11 the Chronicler begins to describe what seeking and forsaking God looks like, using the kings of Judah as examples. These examples are a prescription for spiritual renewal for post-exile Israel.

The kings of Judah are described as either “seeking” (related words: sought, faithful, keep) or “forsaking” (related words: abandon, unfaithful) God. The national condition of Judah follows in step with whether they seek or forsake God and his law.

My thoughts from this:

  1. In 1 Chronicles 29, David exhorts Israel to follow God’s law with a “whole heart” (vv. 9,19), and this language is used again in 2 Chronicles 15 of Asa (vv. 12,15,17). This is to remind Israel, and us, that our seeking of God is not something to boast about. Just like in 1 Chronicles 29, a “whole heart” to seek God does not have its origin in man, but in God (1 Chronicles 29:18,19)! “For it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure” (Philippians 2:13).
  2. The lesson for post-exile Israel was that they should seek to worship God in Jerusalem (2 Chron 11:16), where they could obey his law and commands in sacrifice to receive the mercy of forgiveness. Likewise, we should continuously go to Jesus, the root of Jesse, through whom we offer worship to God by Jesus’ perfect sacrifice, and from whom mercy and grace flows ceaselessly.

 

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